Matthew Matsaganis

Matthew Matsaganis

“In the past three decades, globalization—a process driven in no small measure by technological innovation and the emergence of new communication technologies—has been the subject of considerable research, media coverage, and rhetoric by policymakers and organizations. Much of this research, media content, and rhetoric might lead one to conclude that the old adage “location, location, location” only applies to the real estate market any more. In my research, teaching, and work with the Urban Communication Foundation I have taken the contrary view and I have argued that, in fact, place (still) matters for myriad reasons.

I see my research as a systematic effort to locate communication in the growing multidisciplinary research on how the places people live in impact their lives, and to investigate two interrelated questions: (a) How do the places where individuals bodily experience the conditions of everyday life—i.e., their residential communities—shape communication and how are they shaped by communication? And (b) how does communication—conceptualized as the foundational social process through which people, organizations, institutions, and communities organize and make sense of their activities—mediate the impact of place on individuals’ lives, including, their self-identity, their level of civic engagement, and their physical and mental well-being? My efforts to address these questions have primarily taken the form of research on: communication as determinant of health and health disparities in urban communities, the roles of ethnic media in increasingly diverse communities (from a consumption, production, and policy perspective), and digital inequalities and the social impact of new communication technologies.

Being a member of the Urban Communication Foundation since 2007 and a member of the Foundation’s Board more recently has been particularly fulfilling, as it has enabled me to play a role in encouraging and facilitating much needed research on pressing urban community issues, and promoting this research across disciplinary divides, to institutional stakeholders, and among policymakers.”

Matthew D. Matsaganis (Ph.D., University of Southern California) is an Assistant Professor in the Communication Department at the University at Albany, State University of New York. He is first author of Understanding Ethnic Media: Producers, Consumers and Societies (SAGE, 2011; with Vikki Katz and Sandra Ball-Rokeach) and the co-editor and a contributing author to Communicative Cities in the 21st Century (Peter Lang, 2013; with Vicki Gallagher and Susan Drucker). In addition, his research has been published in the Journal of Health Communication, Human Communication Research, Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism, the Electronic Journal of Communication, Communication Research Reports, the Journal of Information Policy, American Behavioral Scientist,and the Encyclopedia of International Media and Communications. He has presented his work at numerous academic and professional conferences. Matthew is also a recovering print journalist. He has worked for a variety of publications in Athens, Greece, and New York City.