News & Announcements

Spotlight on San Diego: The New Urban Agenda: Applications and Interventions

Fri, May 26, 18:30 to 19:45, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, 5, Cobalt 500

Session Submission Type: Panel

Habitat III took place in October 2016 culminating in an outcome document entitled “The New Urban Agenda”, adopted to “guide the efforts around urbanization of a wide range of actors — nation states, city and regional leaders, international development funders, United Nations programs and civil society — for the next 20 years.”
The Agenda includes a call for compact cities, polycentric growth, mixed-use streetscapes, prevention of sprawl and transit-oriented development.
The New Urban Agenda is a 23-page document that promises that no one will be left behind through inclusive development, economic growth and environmental sustainability. It deals with rights to the city, and unique needs of vulnerable urban populations including women, the LGBT community, the poor, disabled and indigenous peoples. Urban land policies should guarantee housing, for people, for economic profit and for social interaction. The internet, mobility, “smart cities” were acknowledged and incorporated in the discourse of implementation. Social interaction, community and communication technologies were evident but unarticulated in the New Urban Agenda. With the adoption of the New Urban Agenda attention turns to implementation and intervention. Around the world, there are now efforts to judge existing programs, standards, and achievements while develop innovations designed to achieve New Urban Agenda goals. This panel will explore the host city, San Diego through the lens of communication and the New Urban Agenda.

The panel will be chaired by Paula M. Gardner, McMaster University.

The distinguished panelists include:

Gary Gumpert, Urban Communication Foundation

Peter Haratonik, The New School

Susan Drucker, Hofstra University

Angela Booker, BINACOM – Binational Association of Schools of Communication of the Californias

Kieth Pezzoli, BINACOM – Binational Association of Schools of Communication of the Californias

 

Please visit http://tinyurl.com/zv472l4 for more information regarding the event.

The Jane Jacobs Urban Communication Book Award Awarded to Peter Laurence

Urban Communication Foundation sponsored "Jane Jacobs at 100" at the 2016 National Communication Association Convention in Philadelphia. The 2016 Jane Jacobs Book award was also announced. Picture (from left): Casey Lum (William Paterson University), Erik Garrett (Duquesne University), Curry Chandler (Cloud Gehshan Associates), Lewis Freeman (Fordham University), Susan Drucker (Hofstra University), Harvey Jassem (University of Hartford), Gary Gumpert (Urban Communication Foundation), Peter Hecht (University of Pittsburgh), Peter Haratonik (The New School)

Urban Communication Foundation sponsored “Jane Jacobs at 100” at the 2016 National Communication Association Convention in Philadelphia. The 2016 Jane Jacobs Book award was also announced. Picture (from left): Casey Lum (William Paterson University), Erik Garrett (Duquesne University), Curry Chandler (Cloud Gehshan Associates), Lewis Freeman (Fordham University), Susan Drucker (Hofstra University), Harvey Jassem (University of Hartford), Gary Gumpert (Urban Communication Foundation), Peter Hecht (University of Pittsburgh), Peter Haratonik (The New School)

This book offers readers a fascinating intellectual history of Jane Jacobs’ development as a critic and scholar of urban design. Of particular interest is how this deeply researched book delves into the early stages of Jacobs’ career, focusing with particular detail on her formative years as a working journalist in New York. Laurence shows how, as a writer and associate editor at Architectural Forum and other publications during the 1950s, Jacobs drew on her observations of modern architecture and urban renewal planning—as well as her professional connections to leading urbanists of the day—to develop and sharpen her now-legendary critique of top-down modernist planning. In doing so, Laurence convincingly dispels the mythology that has formed around Jacobs as an “amateur” urbanist who burst unexpectedly onto the scene in 1961. Far from it, Jacobs was a working writer and reporter, whose successive professional encounters with the failures of modernist planning and urban renewal compelled her to offer, as Laurence writes, “a wholly new vision of cities” in The Death and Life of Great American Cities—a vision that attempted to nurture, rather than poison, the fragile “ballet” of the street.

This is a book about urban communication in two major senses. First, as noted above, it documents how Jacobs’ early career as a professional journalist formed the crucial foundation for her development as a leading critic of modernist planning and perhaps the most influential urbanist of the late 20th century. Second, Laurence’s book also shows how Jacobs developed a particular understanding of the built environment as a medium of human communication, as a crucial means for shaping and enabling particular forms of social interaction. Not only did she help develop this view of the communicative city in her early writings and intellectual work (e.g., presenting at conferences on “urban design criticism”), but she was instrumental in bringing this view to wider audiences, both before and after the publication of her seminal 1961 book.

In sum, we cannot think of a more worthy selection for the UCF Jane Jacobs Book Award, particularly on the 100th anniversary of Jacobs’ birth in 1916.

Tanja Aitamurto Receives 2016 Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award

Eike Rinke

Tanja Aitamurto

We are pleased to announce that Tanja Aitamurto been chosen as the recipient of the 2016 Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award for her dissertation,” Crowdsourcing for Democracy: New Era in Policy-Making.“.

Tanja Aitamurto, Ph.D. is the Deputy Director and a Brown Fellow (postdoctoral) at the Brown Institute for Media Innovation at the School of Engineering at Stanford. She examines how collective intelligence, whether gathered by crowdsourcing, crowdfunding or co-creation, impacts journalism, governance and product design, particularly media innovations. Her work has been published in several academic journals, such as the New Media and Society and Digital Journalism.

James W. Carey Urban Communication Grant Awarded to Sarah C. Bishop

Sarah C. Bishop

The James W. Carey Urban Communication Grant is awarded to Sarah C. Bishop for (Un)Documented Media Makers and the Search for Connection Online. Bishop’s research considers the interaction of citizenship, media and migration, and she is especially concerned with issues of forced migration and involuntary citizenship.

Sarah C. Bishop is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at Baruch College, City University of New York. At Baruch, Bishop teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Intercultural Communication, Privilege and Difference, and Digital Media Culture.

2016 UCF Eastern Communication Association Applied Urban Communication Research Grant Winner: Rebecca Townsend

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Rebecca Townsend is the recipient of the 2016 UCF Eastern Communication Association Applied Urban Communication Research Grant for her proposed study of Social Networks and Pedestrian Safety. Professor Townsend is a Professor at Manchester Community College, Manchester, CT.

This interdisciplinary work seeks to explore what people say they will do when they engage in a common practice in cities across the globe: cross the street. There is no communication scholarship that explores pedestrian safety messages, nor pedestrian activity, nor how social networks or expert messages about safety affect pedestrian behavior.