Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award

Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award

This annual prize recognizes and rewards doctoral dissertation research that explains, enlightens, inspires, and improves the practice and study of journalism and communication. The winning dissertation should seek and reveal new insights, and reinforce the Journalism Studies Division’s stated aims for “scholarly effort that advances our understanding of how journalism works; and helps clarify, define and question core ideas in our field, such as news, media and journalism.” The award is named after Gene Burd, Professor of Journalism at the University of Texas, who endowed it to help reinforce the Journalism Studies Division’s purpose in supporting scholarly work that advances our understanding of journalism. The award is open to a diversity of methods and topics within journalism studies.

Amount of prize: $1,000, made possible through the generous support of Gene Burd and the Urban Communication Foundation.

For application procedures see www.icahdq.org/about_ica/awards/geneburd.asp

Tanja Aitamurto

Tanja Aitamurto

2016

We are pleased to announce that Tanja Aitamurto been chosen as the recipient of the 2016 Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award for her dissertation,” Crowdsourcing for Democracy: New Era in Policy-Making.“.

Tanja Aitamurto, Ph.D. is the Deputy Director and a Brown Fellow (postdoctoral) at the Brown Institute for Media Innovation at the School of Engineering at Stanford. She examines how collective intelligence, whether gathered by crowdsourcing, crowdfunding or co-creation, impacts journalism, governance and product design, particularly media innovations. Her work has been published in several academic journals, such as the New Media and Society and Digital Journalism.

Previous Recipients of The AEJMC Gene Burd Urban Journalism Award

Sommer Matthis

Sommer Matthis

2014

The 2014 award was presented to Sommer Matthis at a special ceremony during the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) held in Montreal, Canada, August 6-9, 2014.

Sommer Mathis is editor of The Atlantic Cities, The Atlantic‘s sister site devoted to the most groundbreaking ideas and pressing issues facing today’s global cities and neighborhoods.Before joining Atlantic Media in 2011, she spent five years reporting on the Washington, DC metro area, first as editor-in-chief ofDCist.com and later as news editor at local news start-up TBD.com. Her work has also appeared in theTheWashington PostWashingtonian magazine, Architect magazine, and the Guardian. Matthis will be honored at AEJMC’s 97th Annual Conference (aejmc.org/events/montreal2014) in Montréal, Canada. The conference will be held from August 6th-9th.

Tom Condon

Tom Condon

2013

On August 9th, 2013 the Urban Communication Foundation honored Tom Condon with the Gene Burd Urban Journalism Award at the annual Association for Education in Journalism & Mass Communication (AEJMC) conference in Washington D.C..

Tom Condon has held numerous positions at the Courant, from reporter to editor to columnist. In all of those his smart and values driven work has largely focused on making urban life, especially life in and around Hartford, better. Hartford used to be a jewel of a city. It has been tarnished, as have many of the rust-belt cities. Condon has been relentless in looking for solutions and for keeping readers hopeful and engaged. Whether the problem is education, housing, commerce, drugs, tax policy, zoning, transportation, or what have you, Condon has tackled it and argued for sensible pro-livable-city changes.

Blair Kamin

Blair Kamin

2012

On August 10th, 2012 the Urban Communication Foundation honored Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic of the Chicago TribuneBlair Kamin, the 2012 winner of UCF’s Gene Burd Urban Journalism Award, at the annual Association for Education in Journalism & Mass Communication (AEJMC) conference in Chicago.

Blair Kamin won the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 1999, for a body of work highlighted by a series of articles that explored the “problems and promise of Chicago’s greatest public space, its lakefront.” A native of Red Bank, New Jersey, he graduated from Amherst College in 1979 and from the Yale University School of Architecture in 1984 with a Master of Environmental Design. He was a reporter for the Des Moines Register from 1984 to 1987, then joined the Tribune in 1987, covering suburban and cultural news. Since becoming the Tribune’s architecture critic in 1992, he has written about “the full range of the built environment.” Kamin has lectured widely, and has appeared on numerous radio and television programs about architecture, including National Public Radio, the History Channel, and ABC’s Nightline. Among his many awards are the George Polk Award for criticism, the American Institute of Architects’ Institute Honor for Collaborative Achievement and the Peter Lisagor Award for Exemplary Journalism, which he has won 13 times.

Susan Szenasy

Susan Szenasy

2011

The Urban Communication Foundation proudly presented its 2011 AEJMC Gene Burd Urban Journalism Award to Susan Szenasy, editor-in-chief of METROPOLIS, at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism & Mass Communication. Ms. Szenasy, an internationally recognized authority on sustainability and design, has led the award-winning New York City-based magazine since 1986, achieving worldwide recognition with its landmark design journalism. In 2007 she was a joint recipient (with METROPOLIS publisher Horace Havemeyer III) of the Civitas August Heckscher Award for Community Service and Excellence. Ms. Szenasy holds an MA in Modern European History from Rutgers University, and honorary doctorates from Kendall College of Art and Design, the Art Center College of Design, and the Pacific Northwest College of Art.

Inga Saffron

Inga Saffron

2010

Hired by the Inquirer in 1985 as a suburban reporter, Inga Saffron today is a three-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in criticism. One of Ms. Saffron’s champions has said, “Ms. Saffron’s writing is based on a deep understanding of Philadelphia’s distinctive urban fabric, of which she is a passionate but critical advocate. Her great strength is her ability to explain to her readers how each piece of our city – a major new high rise, the demolition of an historic building, or a sidewalk utility box – improves or diminishes the city for its inhabitants. While many in this city still focus only on whether development takes place, Ms. Saffron has become our most vocal proponent for the good quality design and thoughtful planning needed to preserve the city’s rich character and help achieve a more vibrant future.”

Another advocate has said: “Inga brings to her column and to greater Philadelphia a sensibility that is often associated with the phrase “everyday urbanism.” In Inga’s world, an individual building or park or streetscape or interior or piece of furniture is important not because it appeals to the elites or cognoscenti, but because it works for everyday Philadelphians.

Joel Kotkin

Joel Kotkin

Joel Kotkin is an internationally recognized authority on urban trends and their global, economic, political and social ramifications. As a journalist, he has regularly explored urban landscapes, people, and policy for more than two decades. His writings on urban housing and urban planning have appeared in a range of magazines and journals that include The Wharton Real Estate Review, Inc, Newsweek, The American Interest, Commentary, and Metropolis. He also has contributed frequent pieces on urban landscapes and policy for more than two decades in newspapers that include The Washington Post, the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the San Francisco Chronicle, and The Los Angeles Times.

Joel Kotkin is the author of The New Geography: How the Digital Revolution is Reshaping the American Landscape; The City: A global History and the recently published The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050.

His opinions are widely disseminated on Internet blogs that provide forums on individual cities (such as Houston Strategies) and overviews on city issues (such as Planetizen); his voice is also heard regularly on numerous radio and television public affairs programs (such as NPR and CNN). And, finally, his scholarship on changing urban realities has been commissioned by foundations such as The Brookings Institute, The New America Foundation, and The Milkin Institute.

Paul Goldberger

Paul Goldberger

2009

Paul Goldberger has been writing the New Yorker’s “Sky Line” column since 1997. He holds the Joseph Urban Chair in Design and Architecture at the New School in New York City. His career started at the New York Times where he won the Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Journalism in 1984. Paul Goldberger is the contemporary extension of Lewis Mumford, Jane Jacobs, and Ada Louise Huxtable.

In his letter supporting Paul Goldberger’s nomination Kent Barwick, President of the Municipal Art Society of New York said “Paul’s greatest contribution is his writing about cities. How architecture hits the pavement, how projects relate to their surroundings, how physical change affects how we feel about places is his genius.”

Darren Walker of the Rockefeller Foundation said that Goldberger is “a great journalist whose writing has been invaluable in promoting a deeper and more intelligent understanding of urbanism, city making and sustainable urban development.”

Blair Kamin, architecture critic for the Chicago Tribune describes Goldberger’s criticism as “at once elevated and street smart, able to convey sweeping cultural meaning yet precise in its description of architectural detail.”

Stewart Brand

2008

Steward Brand’s Whole Earth Catalog was called a conceptual forerunner of the search engine by Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. It was Brand’s desire to help people find any information they might find useful to themselves that inspired him to publish the massive catalog.

Brand was visiting scientist at the MIT Media Laboratory out of which he produced his 1997 book The Media Lab: Inventing the Future. His other books include How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They’re Built (1994) and The Clock of the Long Now: Time and Responsibility (1999). At MIT Brand pondered “this new configuration” of the “computerized global city.” His recent focus on the “city planet” probes the social and communication consequences of global urbanization seeing the rural to urban exodus as “the largest movement of humanity in history.” In 1966 he convinced NASA to release a satellite image of the earth as seen from space. It appeared on his first catalogue cover and stimulated the ecological awareness leading to the environmental movement and Earth Day.

Peter Applebome & Joel Garreau

Peter Applebome & Joel Garreau

2007

Peter Applebome writes twice a week for the New York Times “Metropolitan Page” on the towns, the suburbs, and those locations outside the immediate place usually referred to as the metropolis. He is a journalist, a commentator, and a story-teller. His columns focus on the human dimensions of living in a geographic place, the shifting connection between individuals and their environment, and the changing values that accompany the fluid and global landscape. The voices and lives of people in changing communities stand out in his articles.

Joel Garreau has represented his talents over a long period of time in the Washington Post, Wired MagazineWhole Earth Review, and in his three books: Nine Nations of North America (1981), Edge City(1991), and Radical Evolution (2005). Through the urban and communication context he has built bridges between journalistic practice and academic research; stimulated interdisciplinary dialogue among urban theorists and practitioners in policy and professorial circles; and as the Post’s “cultural revolution editor”, he is a leading thinker and consultant on the implications of the new Communication technologies and the emerging urban culture of global cities and regions.

John King

John King

2006

John King, a Pulitzer Prize finalist for his emerging significance as a national urban critic, continues the long San Francisco Chronicle tradition of support for local critical commentators and analysts of urban life like that of the late Allan Temko and Herb Caen. King also follows in the footsteps of acclaimed national urban critics such as Lewis Mumford, Jane Jacobs, Ada Huxtable and Grady Clay, who have also seen and written about cities through the architectural lens to interpret, critique, and mediate the interaction of city planners, urban policies and the public. King educates readers about the interface of urban form and function, and the relationships of the natural and built environment through his weekly column “Place”.