Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award

Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award

This annual prize recognizes and rewards doctoral dissertation research that explains, enlightens, inspires, and improves the practice and study of journalism and communication. The winning dissertation should seek and reveal new insights, and reinforce the Journalism Studies Division’s stated aims for “scholarly effort that advances our understanding of how journalism works; and helps clarify, define and question core ideas in our field, such as news, media and journalism.” The award is named after Gene Burd, Professor of Journalism at the University of Texas, who endowed it to help reinforce the Journalism Studies Division’s purpose in supporting scholarly work that advances our understanding of journalism. The award is open to a diversity of methods and topics within journalism studies.

Amount of prize: $1,000, made possible through the generous support of Gene Burd and the Urban Communication Foundation.

For application procedures see www.icahdq.org/about_ica/awards/geneburd.asp

Previous Recipients of the Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award

Tanja Aitamurto

Tanja Aitamurto

2016

We are pleased to announce that Tanja Aitamurto been chosen as the recipient of the 2016 Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award for her dissertation,” Crowdsourcing for Democracy: New Era in Policy-Making.“.

Tanja Aitamurto, Ph.D. is the Deputy Director and a Brown Fellow (postdoctoral) at the Brown Institute for Media Innovation at the School of Engineering at Stanford. She examines how collective intelligence, whether gathered by crowdsourcing, crowdfunding or co-creation, impacts journalism, governance and product design, particularly media innovations. Her work has been published in several academic journals, such as the New Media and Society and Digital Journalism.

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Eike Mark Rinke

2015

Eike Mark Rinke
Eike is a research associate in the Mannheim Centre for European Social Research (MZES) at the University of Mannheim, Germany. He studies normative aspects of political communication with a particular interest in mediated public deliberation, journalism, and cross-national comparative research.

2014

Matt Powers
Matt is an Assistant Professor in the Dept of Communication at the University of Washington (in Seattle).  Hisdissertation Humanity’s Publics is about the role humanitarian and human rights NGOs play in shaping – and in some cases directly producing – international news coverage. It takes the usual questions journalism scholars ask journalists – how news gets made, what values guide its production, etc. – into the unfamiliar setting of the NGO. Given the diminished capacity of US news organizations to cover international affairs, groups like Amnesty International and Human Rights – to name just two – are increasingly important sources of information for international news. The dissertation tries to figure out how they produce information and what the implications of this trend is for journalism, for NGOs and the broader public.

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Robert E. Gutsche Jr.

2013

Robert E. Gutsche Jr.
Robert is an assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Florida International University. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Iowa in 2012. His dissertation explores how local news explained a recent migration of black residents from inner-city Chicago to an Iowa City, Iowa neighborhood called the Southeast Side. By applying sociological understandings and cultural theory, his project explicates how the institution of white supremacy operated within news coverage and public policy to subjugate these new arrivals, in part, by demonizing their neighborhood. In turn, this research – and forthcoming book and article in Visual Communication – implicates news media as dominant place-makers through a methodology of mental mapping, a participatory tool that allowed journalists, official news sources, and Southeast Side residents to draw and describe how they experience and explain city spaces. For more, visit robertgutschejr.com.

Nikki Usher

2012

Nikki Usher
Nikki is an assistant professor at the George Washington University School of Media And Public Affairs. She completed her PhD at the University of Southern California in 2011. Her dissertation is an “in-depth ethnography of business news in the digital age.”  Her study is of The New York Times and uses an ethnographic approach to examine a particularly important time in the history of the paper, the shift from a primarily print oriented publication to one that must meet the demands of a twenty-four hour news cycle. She pays special attention to the paper’s coverage of business immediately after the financial collapse of 2008 and the values of the journalists are situated in a larger social reality.

Kristen Gustafson

2011

Kristin Gustafson
Kristin is a lecturer at University of Washington Bothell. Her research examines the symbiotic relationship between social movements and grassroots U.S. newspapers. Her most recent project focuses on the histories of two grassroots, activist Seattle newspapers that emerged in the post-Civil Rights era. Both newspapers, published since the 1970s, provide a voice for those absent from or often times stereotyped in mainstream media including one paper serving multiple generations of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Vietnamese, and other Asian Americans and the other for gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender, and queer people in Seattle. Related to these questions about journalism practices, she also asks where and how marginalized communities use their political voice.

Lokman Tsui

Lokman Tsui
Lokman is an Assistant Professor in Media and Communication at the City University of Hong Kong. He received his PhD degree from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. From 2008 – 2009, Lokman was also a Student Fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society. His research interests center around new media, global communication, and journalism, with a focus on issues of freedom of expression, media policy and justice. He was born and raised in the Netherlands and used to run the unofficial website for filmmaker Wong Kar Wai for many years.

Christopher W. Anderson

2010

Christopher W. Anderson
C.W. Anderson is an Assistant Professor of Media Culture at the College of Staten Island (City University of New York.) His forthcoming book, Networking the News, is based on his dissertation. It chronicles the history of online journalism in Philadelphia from 1997 until the present, and discusses what the lessons of Philadelphia can teach us about journalism in the digital age.

At CUNY, Anderson teaches classes in both journalism and media studies. From 2009-2010, he was a Knight Media Policy Fellow at the New America Foundation in Washington, DC. From 2009-2011, he was a Visiting Fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School. He has published in numerous academic journals and book collections, and writes occasionally at the Nieman Journalism Lab and the Atlantic Online. His website is at http://cwanderson.org.